Why other web developers hate me, and why that's good for you

hs-me

This was me, the last time I had hair. Like that eagle medallion? It was the 70's...

me-now

This is me now. No hair.
And no medallion...

easy

I'm Jess Zimmerman, the main guy here at Website In One Week. I work with a talented team of developers and marketing specialists who share a common goal: to build websites (and drive traffic to them) in order to help small businesses grow and prosper.

I've been building custom websites for about 20 years, and I decided to create WIOW because I noticed a serious gap in the market for business websites. For a business owner who needs a website (in other words, every business owner), there are only two options: use a free or low-cost website builder (like Wix or Squarespace), or pay a developer (like me) thousands of dollars for a custom website. Here are the problems with that:

  1. Using a free or cheap system will save you money, but you won't make any money from the site. Is that really a smart move? You might be able to produce a decent-looking site this way, but it won't be optimized for marketing—it will just sit there, doing nothing. You might as well not even bother.
  2. Hiring someone to build a custom site for you will get you a great-looking site, but it's still no guarantee that it will be marketing-focused. That's because most web developers are more interested in making themselves look good than in helping your business—and very few of them understand marketing anyway. I've seen terrible websites that cost $10,000 and did nothing for the customer's business.

Since neither of these choices are good for most small businesses, I decided to fill the gap by offering good-looking, marketing-focused websites at a cost any business could afford. My sites don't have all of the bells and whistles that are out there, but here's a little secret: bells and whistles might be fun to look at, but they don't make money for you. The things that turn a business website into a money machine are simple and relatively low-tech. Most developers don't want to build sites like that because they can't charge a lot for them or show off the latest useless gadget. By focusing on business fundamentals, I can create sites that work at a price any business can afford.

Oh, and one more thing: people often ask me how much a website costs. I hate that question. It's like asking how much a house costs without knowing anything about it. I understand the confusion; website pricing is all over the place. On one hand, I see people selling absolute garbage sites created with crappy, ancient software for $99; on the other, I see people selling sites for $10,000 that I know only took them a few days to build. It's no wonder that most people have no idea how much a site should cost. While I would love to sell everyone a $10,000 website, I know that many businesses can't afford that, and there are very few who need it. That's why I decided to make the pricing for WIOW simple and upfront so people would know exactly how much it will cost—just like every other investment they make for their business.